Little on Brain Research [march]

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Little on Brain Research [march]

Post  Mira W. on Mon Apr 06, 2015 1:32 pm

We are all aware of the negative effects of high-fat foods, such as obesity, along with heart diseases and heightened risks of stroke. Seeing as we don't suffer from a stroke right after eating a hamburger, nor do we gain 50 pounds by eating some french fries, we are less motivated to follow healthy diets, telling ourselves that "this one time won't hurt!" I do so myself -- pizza can be very tempting.

However, such foods alter your gut microbiome, or the bacteria in your gut. The interesting part is, these bacteria have a large role in ensuring stable physiological functions. This lead to research being conducted on mice suffering from obesity, and the results are worrying. It was shown that changes in their microbiomes due to high-fat diets lead to behavioral problems, as well as increased their risks of other neuropsychiatric issues! Following these experiments, further questions had risen: Does a high-fat diet cause similar effects even if the person in question isn't suffering from obesity? Unfortunately, research suggests the answer is yes. Non-obese mice underwent gut transplantation, receiving microbiota from other mice that had a high-fat diet. Drastic changes could be observed in their behavior, including memory deficiencies, and anxiety. Therefore, even a short-term high-fat diet can impair not only the rest of our body's health, but our brain as well. Of course, further research must be conduct, but current results are already alarming... Hope this provides enough motivation to lay off the pizza for a while!

"This paper suggests that high-fat diets impair brain health, in part, by disrupting the symbiotic relationship between humans and the microorganisms that occupy our gastrointestinal tracks," - Dr. John Krystal, Editor of Biological Psychiatry.


On the other hand, living in a Spanish-speaking country while attending an English-speaking school proves to be quite beneficial for our minds. Recent research at St. Michael's Hospital shows that Alzheimer's patients who speak more than one language begin experiencing symptoms far later than those who speak only one. Two groups of patients were observed, with all participants being at roughly the same cognitive level (memory, attention, and organization skills were tested), divided according to whether they are bilingual or uni-lingual. The results were astounding; it was shown that those who are fluently bi- or multi- lingual keep their brain "in shape" by switching between two or more languages, which essentially allows the brain to adapt to more easily to the Alzheimer's disease. In fact, it has been shown to repress symptoms for over 5 years!

"This is unheard of -- no medicine comes close to delaying the onset of symptoms and now we have the evidence to prove this at the neuroanatomical level," - Dr. Tom Schweizer, lead neuroscientist for this research.

Both of these examples show the vast amount of information we have yet to uncover concerning the human brain. It is incredibly complex, and we can only hope to fully understand it one day. Today, scientists still cannot answer questions such as, "What are thoughts?" "What is consciousness?" "Why do we dream?" or even, "How does our memory work?"
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Mira W.
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wowwww

Post  Gloria H. on Mon Apr 06, 2015 7:49 pm

thats very interesting Smile i will be researching more on this it looks so intresting. its crazy how living in a spanish speaking country and learning english at school is good Smile we all have a great advantage

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Re: Little on Brain Research [march]

Post  Vasilisa on Mon Apr 06, 2015 9:38 pm

Seriously I have no clue how scientists can figure all of this out. To me its like a mystery that would never be discovered. The topics you choose are really interesting. Keep it up!

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