Review of section three native groups

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Review of section three native groups

Post  Brock M. Hay on Wed Feb 29, 2012 10:08 pm


Since we are approaching the unit test, I figured it would be smart to cover section three of what we recently just did. So the deal is, many many groups of native peopel lived throughout North America, they were nothing like the Incan and Aztec empires, but they all had unique advancements and ciltures. OUt of the dozens that existed, this section mentions the ones that pop out among others, the more unique ones. Lets do this in the order that the text book did it, lets start with the desserts southwest US and North west Mexico. These desserts were quite the merciless ones, where feew native groups could thive. The Hohokams were responsible for the irrigation systems that were very complex and ran through the dessert and resulted in agriculture. I have no idea why they would have settled in a dessert, but maybe there will be ideas in the comments, like exile from another tribe. Good details to mention is that they existed in present day Arizona, and that they survived until about 1500 AD, cause of their end was a drought. The Anasazis, who existed in modern day Arizona, New Mexico, Coolorado, and Utah (okay, Colorado is a bit more north but whatever) and existed from 900 to 1300 AD. They had built large five story complexes uses adobe bricks, having things called Kivas, or religous temples of the Anasazis. Their large village areas were named Pueblos by the Spanish. No lets move a bit east to Southeastern USA, where the mound builders existed.The only reasons we know of these people were because later tribes passed down the stories and heritage of the mound builders oraly. They had huge trade routes from the gulf of Mexico to the geat lakes in southeastern Canada. The mound builders died out by 800 AD, but their ancestors after them lived by their ways, also building mound structures as various living quarters and such. These were the Cahokia, existing in modern day Mississipi who similarily to the Aztecs had sacrifices for the sun. Now lets go north, its also pretty funny how the book is kind of racist and puts the entire country of Canada as an arctic/subarctic region, but only th northern half of it is (still cold in any other part) where the Inuits live. The Inuits are greatly dictated by their geography, they have no agriculture. They live off of ice rishing and hitting seals in the head with clubs to hunt them, they literally hit them in the heads with clubs, anyway most of their trade and clothes are based from their warm seal blubber as well, also using seal bones as tools (they didn't like to waste anything). They would travel using sleds, it was actually quite efficient and easy given there wer no plants or vegetation, or rocks, or life to stop them. That is prbably the only reason why they could survive is because they had easy travel with their sleds. Now the last native group, living in the easter area of north America, this area is mostly owned by Canada (region where I come from yay) the forested areas by the great lakes and the St. Lawrence river. Here lived the Iroquis league, a group of people with a system of control much more advanced than any other native group around. They had a counsel system of government very similar to Spartan oligarchy (yes, we Canadians are like Spartans at heart). This government called the Iroquis league just came to pass at the turn of the century in 1500 AD right before the colonists arrived, before this they were a very war favoring area that always fought (like Spartans!) of course until this new government was enforced. This is what I have for the blog, I hope it helps, given any other student could possibly read this besides a desperate Sunday night, in that case put in the comments how did the test go?
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Brock M. Hay
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NERD!

Post  Brandon H. on Sat Mar 03, 2012 9:38 pm

That`s a very big review, it did cover most native North American groups. My favorite are the Inuits, because they are unique, and I am familar with them so I feel smart talking about them. This was a good review for section three, it gave me some reminders on it and I should have probably seen it before the test. Thanks for the review though.
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Section 3 Review

Post  MariaelenaFarina on Sun Mar 04, 2012 2:47 pm

Darn it! I should have logged on to the World History Forum before the test..... oh well. Nothing i can do about it now, what's done is done...

Anyways, back to the review. It was a great review and it reminded me of a few things that i had already forgotten.

Here are some things that i thought were interesting about Section 3:
-The Hohokams were responsible for the irrigation systems that were very complex and ran through the dessert and resulted in agriculture.
-They had built large five story complexes using adobe bricks, having things called Kivas, or religous temples of the Anasazis.
-The Iroquois League had a counsel system of government very similar to the Spartan oligarchy.

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